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Death of Anne Cullinane (Munster Athletics)

Anne Cullinane née Collins R.I.P. - Condolences

May 31st 2020

 

anne cullinane munster athletics

Anne Cullinane (née Collins), R.I.P.

The Officers and Officials of Cork Athletics County Board extend their condolences and deepest sympathy to the family of our late Munster Athletics colleague Anne Cullinane, who died peacefully on Friday, following a long illness. Cork Athletics County Board reiterates Munster Athletics tribute in saying "She dedicated her life to athletics and will be greatly missed by us all"


Notice on RIP.ie

The death has occurred of Anne CULLINANE (née Collins), Killarney Road, Abbeyfeale, Limerick

Anne Cullinane (nee Collins), Killarney Road, Abbeyfeale, Co. Limerick. Anne, wife of the late Christy, passed away peacefully on Friday June 26th 2020 at University Hospital Kerry. Anne is very sadly missed by her loving sons Michael and Maurice, daughters-in-law Liz and Noreen, grandchildren Emma, Alex, Amy, Keith, Aoife, Eimear and Orla, greatgrandson Kallum, brother Mike (U.S.A.), sister Noreen (U.S.A.), nephews, nieces, cousins, relatives and her many close friends.

Rest In Peace

 

A Private Family Funeral will take place, for immediate family, due to Government advice and HSE guidelines regarding public gatherings. Requiem Mass will be live streamed on Monday at 11am on the following link: www.churchservices.tv/abbeyfealeparish

House private, please.

For those who would like to pay their respects by means of standing in a guard of honour, the funeral cortège will depart The Church of The Assumption, Abbeyfeale, on Monday at 12 noon on route to Reilig Íde Naofa, Abbeyfeale.

Those who would have liked to attend the funeral, but due to current restrictions cannot, please feel free to leave a message in the Condolence Book at the bottom of this page or send Mass cards and letters of sympathy by post c/o Harnett’s Funeral Home, The Square, Abbeyfeale, Co. Limerick. You may also send your condolences by email to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. The family intends to hold a Memorial Mass to celebrate Anne’s life at a later stage.

 

 

The 1985 Cork 800 Marathon - Guest Article by John Walshe

Marathon in 1985 got an extra boost from the Cork 800 celebrations

Easter Monday, April 8th 1985

 

billy gallagher cork city marathon winner 1985

 

This article, by John Walshe, appeared in The Echo, on Tuesday June 23rd 2020


Cork Athletics Facebook Page

 

Results of Athletics Ireland Registered Events - April 2014 - May 2016 (on Old Cork Athletics website)

 

Results of Athletics Ireland Registered Events - May 2016 to date

 

Race Calendar / Fixtures List - Athletics Ireland Registered Events

 

Cork Athletics Race Calendar

Cork Athletics Find Your Races

Comprehensive Calendar of Registered Athletics Ireland events in Cork


Results of the other Cork City Marathons from the 80's

1982

1983

1984

1986

 

CORK CITY MARATHON 1985

This article, by John Walshe, appeared in The Echo, on Tuesday June 23rd 2020

 

cork 800 marathon 1985 parnell bridgeEarly stages, after starting outside AIB on South Mall, the filed makes it's way over Parnell Bridge. Note Pat Dempsey, Leevale AC, on bottom left

Thirty-five year ago, the Cork 800 celebrations proved to be a blessing for the increasing number of races then appearing on the scene as the once-off ‘Cork 800’ logo on the finishers’ plaque became a special attraction for participants.

To celebrate that 1985 occasion, a couple of new races appeared over the ‘8K’ distance, one organised by St Finbarr’s and the other by the Togher club - Togher 8k Results.

Another popular event was the Cork Half-Marathon held by the Friends of the Wheelchair Association on St Patrick’s Day. This was seen as the ideal build-up to the fourth adidas Cork City Marathon fixed for April 8.

It took place over roughly the second half of the marathon route and attracted over 1,100 runners. Two Kerry athletes, John Linehan and John Griffin, finished first and second with Tony Ryan from Dungarvan third. Catherine Hourihan of St Finbarr’s won the women’s race, but neither would figure over the full distance three weeks later.

After the excitement and controversy of the previous year, the 1985 marathon was a much quieter affair as the national governing body BLE decided to hold their championship race separately in Limerick at the end of June.

However, there was still a good incentive to attract the top athletes to Cork as the first prize was an all-expenses paid trip to the New York City Marathon the following November.

Almost 1,000 entries were received and speaking at the press conference before the race, Michael O’Connell of adidas said they were pleased with the response as the bad weather over the previous few months had not been conducive to marathon training.

The organisers were also making every effort to make it a value for money event with every participant being rewarded with a special Cork 800 T-shirt while all finishers received the marathon medallion, all for an entry fee of six pounds.

The course had been changed from the previous three versions and now went through Douglas village before doubling back through Church Street onto the main Douglas Road. It made for a faster route as the exclusion of the dreaded Temple Hill made it much easier.

The pre-race favourites were Paddy Murphy from Kildare, fourth the previous year and now the world veteran marathon champion, and Roscommon man, Billy Gallagher.

The 29-year-old Gallagher, who worked as a Department of Agriculture official in Cavan town, had completed over 20 marathons and was considered something of an ‘iron man’. Amongst his accomplishments was winning the Templemore 50-miler just three weeks after finishing third in the National Marathon.

Local hopes rested on John Buckley, then coming to the end of a senior career which saw him winning the Irish Cross-Country title at just 19 years of age.

Reaching veteran status would see him enter another hugely successful sphere, culminating in world titles six years later. Profiled before the marathon, the St Finbarr’s man said: “times have really changed now with events like the Evening Echo Mini-Marathon and the marathons and half-marathons introducing hundreds of people to running,” sentiments that no doubt could be repeated today.

With Lucy O’Donoghue unable to take part due to injury and the non-appearance of British international Sally McDiarmuid, the women’s race was seen as a battle between Shelia Curtin of North Cork (the Munster 10-mile champion) and Catherine Speight of Leevale, who had performed well in the adidas series of 10km races for women around the Tramore Road circuit.

Although the weather hadn’t been favourable in the days leading up to Easter Monday, conditions on the morning were ideal, dry with very little wind. Shortly after the opening mile (reached in 4:58), a group of six had formed at the front. The two favourites Gallagher and Murphy were there, along with Buckley, Michael Carey of Leevale, Christy Ryan (West Tipperary) and regular contender Willie Hayes of Reenavanna.

The three-mile mark came up in 15:38 and shortly afterwards it was down to five as Ryan lost contact. Coming up to eight miles, Carey and Hayes were dropped and after reaching the 10-mile checkpoint in 52:43, Buckley also had to let go.

Gallagher and Murphy passed through the half-way point in 68:22, with still no sign of hurt on either of their faces. Back through the city and down the Marina, Gallagher opened a slight five metre lead but on the climb out of Blackrock, Murphy had regained contact with the clock showing 1:45:05 at 20 miles.

It stayed that way up to 23 miles but then when the leaders hit the roundabout leading into Douglas, Gallagher made his move. Murphy failed to respond and the younger man slowly pulled away.

Approaching the finish, Gallagher realised he had a chance of breaking 2:19 for the first time and a lunge for the line saw him just getting there in 2:18:58.

A tiring Murphy finished almost a minute later in 2:19:51 and then there was a big gap before a delighted Michael Carey arrived to take third in 2:26:42 and, with it, the Munster title.

Willie Hayes, sixth three years before, had another consistent run to improve to fourth in 2:29:29, just 27 seconds ahead of a man who had arguably the performance of the day.

For Derry O’Driscoll from Cobh, running for St Finbarr’s, it was a remarkable personal best time at the age of 47. After running 2:33 in the Sea of Galilee Marathon before Christmas, O’Driscoll thought he might have an outside chance of breaking 2:30 and achieve this he did by four seconds when recording 2:29:56.

Two clubmates of Paddy Murphy from Kildare, Brendan Domican and Stephen O’Toole, took sixth and seventh positions. John Buckley suffered a lot over the final few miles but kept going to eventually finish in 2:45:21 for 26th position.

Sheila Curtin from Newtownshandrum ran an excellent race to take the women’s title in only her second marathon. The Fr Liam Kelleher-coached Curtin – whose sister Maura had finished second two years before – had to stop at 20 miles where she was passed by Catherine Speight.

Regaining her composure, she passed Speight again three miles later to finish in 3:01:23 and but for her bad patch would surely have broken the three-hour barrier.

Speight was rewarded with a credible 3:04:13 for second and Marion Lyons, in her first marathon, took third in 3:06:58.

As in every marathon, there were many tales of courage and inspiration. One such performance was that of Richard O’Mahony from the Crusaders club in Dublin. He finished 15th overall in a time of 2:41:02 despite the double handicap of being deaf and dumb.  

NEXT WEEK: 1986 – ALL GOOD THINGS COME TO AN END

    
Full Results, Irish Runner Magazine Report and Results Booklet

1985 adidas cork 800 marathon results booklet 011

RESULTS (MEN)

1 Billy Gallagher         2:18:58
2 Pat Murphy                2:19:51
3 Michael Carey                2:26:42
4 Willie Hayes                2:29:29
5 Derry O’Driscoll        2:29:56
6 Brendan Domican        2:31:38
7 Stephen O’Toole        2:32:06
8 Roddy Burke                2:32:37
9 Michael Roche                2:33:20
10 Christy Crowley        2:34:17

 

RESULTS (WOMEN)

1 Sheila Curtin                3:01:23
2 Catherine Speight        3:04:13
3 Marion Lyons                3:06:58
4 Rose Crockett                3:08:32
5 Triona Kelly                3:16:39
6 Mary Sweeney                3:21:07

 

Amongst the 733 recorded finishers were:

* George Walsh from Youghal was over eight minutes faster than the previous year when finishing 12th in 2:37:06.

* Husband-and-wife Eric and Rose Crockett (St Finbarr’s) recorded respective times of 2:38:16 and 3:08:32.

* Under the three hours were Pat Motyer from Ballycotton (2:57:06), Joe Murphy of Eagle (2:57:13) and John O’Connell from Passage West who just made it with 2:59:02.

* Just missing a sub-3:00 by 14 seconds was John Brady from Charleville who finished 95th overall.

* Athletics historian Liam Fleming from Ballinascarthy ran 3:06:38 with Tim Geary of Leamlara close behind on 3:07:53.

* Not far away were Maurice Tobin of the Youghal club – now a member of Grange-Fermoy – who finished in 3:08:58 and Christy O’Driscoll from Dublin Hill who clocked 3:09:23.

* Peter Fenlon recorded 3:12:27 with Anthony Prendergast of St Nicholas (Castlelyons) six seconds behind in 3:12:33.

* Dan Nagle from the Mallow club finished in 3:21:59 with Anthony Donnachie from Cobh on 3:24:13.

* Two Cork BHAA stalwarts, Sean Walsh and Eddie Mullane, both of the Quigley Company, finished a second apart in times of 3:27:30 and 3:27:31.

 


Other Guest Articles by John Walshe

Pioneering Women of Cross-Country - Guest Article by John Walshe

 

Grange International Cross-Country of 1980 Recalled 40 Years On - Guest Article by John Walshe

 

Youghal AC's London Emer Casey 10k Exploits

 

30 Years Ago - Liam O'Brien Wins Cork County Senior Cross-Country Championship

 

50 Years Ago - When John Buckley Beat The Olympic Champion

 

40 Years Ago - Jerry Murphy Wins Munster Marathon Championship

 

Aoife Cooke Runs 55:17 in Mallow 10 2019

 

Munster Cross-Country of 1989

 

Steeplechase Legends Meet at Antrim International

 

Aidan Hogan - Ultra-Athlete

 

RUNNING FOR BETTER

 

Cork to Cobh 40 Years Ago

 

Unique National Double for McGraths

 

Dick Hooper Speaks at St Finbarrs AC Function

 

 

Hammer Thrower Declan Hegarty Interview - Marathon Magazine Aug-Sep 1985

Declan Hegarty Interviewed by Fr. Liam Kelleher

Marathon Magazine - August - September 1985

 declan hegarty cork city sports 1985a
Declan Hegarty, Civil Service AC, throwing at the 1985 Cork City Sports

 
Download Marathon Magazine article, August - Setpember, P 12 -15

Right in the top flight and planning to stay there is . . . DECLAN HEGARTY

It is not too often that field event athletes get featured in athletics publications. This month we are pleased to bring you an Interview with Declan Hegarty, who became famous with his hammer cage wrecking in Los Angeles last year. He has put that experience behind him, and has reached new heights for all the good reasons this year. Living in Los Angeles, and coached by former Olympic champion Hal Connolly, Declan took time off to talk to me just after setting a C.B.P. at the B.L.E. National Championships in Cork.

 

declan hegarty cbp national championships corkDeclan Hegarty after setting a Championship Best at the 1985 BLE National T&F Championships, in Cork

Fr. Kelleher: A wet and windy Cork, a big change from Los Angeles, the West Coast etc., how do you feel after today's performance?
Declan: Under the circumstances, It was O.K., a bit wet and sloppy in the circle. I won the title and that's what I came here to do.


Fr. Kelleher: You were over 70m, was that pleasing to you? Or did you expect to throw better?
Declan: I was hoping for a better throw. It wasn't so much that the circle was slippy but the cold breeze and the rain chilled you a bit.
 declan hegarty paddy mcgovern national championships cork

Declan Hegarty being congratulated by BLE President, Paddy McGovern

 

Fr. Kelleher: Last week-end at Crystal Palace you came second, was that a disappointment for you that you didn't get the gold although it was an achievement to get the silver?
Declan: It is always a disappointment to come second. I threw 76m and that's my third best ever performance. If I could keep up at that level I would be very happy. The problem is that you get worn down from competing week after week. It's tough to keep the form going.

"It is always a disappointment to be second”

Fr. Kelleher: David Smith, a relative newcomer, is after making a big breakthrough. / was expecting a bigger challenge from Martin Garvan and Matt Mileham. Did you know of his phenomenal improvement?
Declan: I heard he had thrown 77m. When he threw 73m at the Cork City Sports I thought it was an earlier big throw that he had got. But he pulled another 77m. throw at the AAA's. That was a surprise and he pulled it out at the right time to take the gold medal.

Fr. Kelleher: He is one of the few that hasn't gone abroad. What is the reason he has made it in the British isles? The conditions are really against it. Is he a man of the future or has he reached his limit?
Declan: It's hard to say if a man has reached his limit. If he keeps throwing as he seems to have been up to this, there is no doubt that he will throw further. He is a very big, athletic thrower. He is working 8 hours a day as an electrician in England and I'm not sure if that will allow him the time to put in the work that he will need to go further. As you get further along, it takes more and more time and commitment per day. In California, I teach for 6 hours a day and then I have the rest of the time off. It's warmer out there and sunnier. It allows you to get a great amount of training in. Fr. Kelleher: At the Cork City Sports where you were second to Sedykh, did you learn anything from that particular performance? Watching Sedykh, your coach, i'm sure took a lot of film of his techniques. Did you learn something from him that will help you in the future? Declan: The more I compete against him the better I get to know the man. When he *    throws 10m further than you, it makes
you feel you are missing something. I think it's years and years of commitment. He is thirty years old. He has been throwing from the age of 13. He is nearly 17 years throwing. Each year he got a little bit stronger, improved his technique a little bit, worked on jumps and sprints and trunk strength.
I think we have been overemphasising the weight-room training. I think it's more to do with speed, trunk strength and technique that really comes with these big throws because he is not a very big man. He is just 17 stone, which is big by human standards, but in relation to shot putters and discus throwers he is small.

 

sedykh smith hegarty lap of honour cork 1985
Declan Hegarty, Yuri Sedykh and David Smith on their Lap of Honour at the 1985 Cork City Sports

 

On Sedykh:
"The more / compete against him the better / get to know the man. When he throws 10m further than you, it makes you feet you are missing something".

 

hammer presentation cork city sports 1985
Hammer Presentation at 1985 Cork City Sports, with former Olympic Champions, Hal Connolly and Yuri Sedykh


Fr. Kelleher: Do you think the East Germans, West Germans and the Eastern European countries like Russia have no special secret forumla, that we thought 4 or 5 years ago.
Declan: I think they have a greater number of throwers in a more supervised condition. For an Irish thrower, he is a part-time thrower. He is going to school and he is cyclying his bicycle across the city to get to training. He is not really in a structured setting whereas a young Russian thrower would be in a camp. He might have to take a few classes but he would go out and take a few throws. The coach would be there all the time.

For a coach to do that in Ireland, year in, year out, it would take a lot of commitment. Phil Conway has done that for over 10 years. He has put in his time and it's hard to keep that going. What we need are more coaches out there, putting in more time as opposed to relying on one man like Phil Conway.

Fr. Kelleher: We both attended the European coaching in Edinburgh in 79. Bon Derchur was there, the famous hammer thrower, coach. Was that a turning point for you, going to that particular congress?
Declan: I wouldn't say it was a turning point but it was a positive input. From the start from John Kent in Dublin to Harold Conolly in California, each person I have worked with and each year I have thrown, I have learned some more and I have got fitter and faster and stronger. It has been a long building process that's far from finished. I'm still at another step on a ladder, I should think. Every person, every expert in the event that I have talked to has given me more to think about, more ideas to work on.

Fr. Kelleher: You have given me a lot of your philosophy there. To return to the competition, before the Cork City Sports, what was your competition before that?

Declan: I threw 77-78m out at the Mount Sac relays and 77.40m at the Bruce Jennor meet.

I must say that I see a lot of athletes abusing the privilege of free room and board for four years. They are providing a coach for you who is out there every day to look after you and your technique".

Fr. Kelleher: Did that give you a psychological advantage having beaten the Olympic champion?
Declan: It did. It was multifactorial. First of all I was throwing at my very best which doesn't happen to you all the year round. There is some point of the year where you reach your peak. He wasn't throwing particularly far so it was a combination of those two things that allowed me to catch him. I was trying to keep a realistic view on the whole thing. It is always a pleasure to beat the Olympic champion. It made me think back to the Games last year. I would have liked to have beaten him even more.

declan hegartyDeclan Hegarty


Fr. Kelleher: That brings me nicely to LA. A lot of people would feel that you gained notoriety, not just here but all over the world, with your hammer cage exploits. Looking back now, how do you feel about it at this particular time, and then I will ask you how did you feet when it happened?
Declan: At this particular time when I'm looking back on it, I think it's alright. I'm amused at the whole thing. It created, as one newspaper man said, "I reached athletic immortality". The only other couple of people who reached that like Carl Lewis would have done that through winning gold medals. It looks like he took the hard way around it.


I created more attention than I ever thought possible. From a practical viewpoint the cage is there to stop the hammers from going out of the sector. The hammer event is an event in which the hammers sometimes go out of the sector. All the cage was doing was stopping it. The only problem was it didn't stop it from falling down, the cage falling to the ground. It wasn't supposed to happen. There are lots of meets you go into where the cage isn't structured properly to contain the hammer and you end up throwing them on the track and everybody gets very excited and annoyed at you.


It's like motor racing, you have to go in there. You have to go for it and you take your chances. It may crack up, it may break down on you and it may hold up for you. I think it's a sign of how well prepared you are. Before the Olympics I was a bit erratic. I was throwing into the net too long. Even though I increased my throwing strength I broke the Irish record before the Games. My technique was very hit and miss. I was a little bit unstable. When you get into the qualifying rounds and you have three throws to get over 72m, it's tough to put you in a spot like that.


People who have thrown over 80m are throwing on their first throws at 67m. It's quite an alarming experience when there is 100,000 people roaring and screaming at you. I'm glad I was there and got that experience. If I bomb out at all, I may as well bomb out and attract attention.

Fr. Kelleher: How did you feel about it at the time?

Declan: I was very depressed. I was distraught.


Fr. Kelleher: Did anybody say anything to you that made you more disgruntled?

Declan: It wasn't what people were saying to me but I was annoyed at myself for not being able to go over 72m for the qualifying round. Every time I started accelerating the hammer, it got ahead of me. The 70m throw I had was very easy. I took that throw to set up for the 3rd round. I planned to add a little bit to it. But I added too much to it and it went out of hand.

"As one newspaper man said: I reached athletic immortality. The only other couple of people who reached that, like Carl Lewis, would have done that through winning gold medals. It looks like he took the hard way around it".

Fr. K : We have covered the immediate past and r-e distant past. In between, you spent 4 or 5 years in Boston. Was that part and parcel of your improvement?
Declan: When you leave school in Ireland you are in a situation where you have to start earning your living. You get off work at 5 p.m. and it's dark in Winter. In America it allows you to train in an athletic environment. It gives you free room and board. It gives you a free education at third level. It gives you a coach who is paid full-time to watch you every day.
It also has its bad points, runners are inclined to say that they are overworked, overtrained or overused in the competitions. I must say that I see a lot of athletes abusing the privilege of free room and board for four years. They are providing a coach for you who is out there every day to look after you and your technique. In this day and age a free education is an opportunity not to be missed. All you have to do for that is to go out and do what you love to do anyway. I think America gives you a great opportunity. It prolongs your career another five years and after that you are in the same boat again.

 

Fr. Kelleher: How did California work out?
Declan: The training I had in Boston was better than the training I was getting in Dublin. It allowed me to train more. It allowed me to train at a higher intensity but the snow in the winter was a big problem. The snow would be down for three months. If you are a shot putter or runner you can throw and run indoors. But the hammer is an event where you need to be outside throwing. Ten feet of snow doesn't help that.


I spent five years in Boston. I spent an extra year there taking my Masters. I decided at the end of the five years that if I wanted to further my hammer career I needed to get to some better weather. As the Olympic Games were being held in L.A. I decided I would go out to the Games and stay there. Fortunately, I met Harold Connolly a few years beforehand. I discussed the matter with him. He said that it shouldn't be any great problem. I moved out there on speculation that I was going to get work in a pub or something just to get settled. I was expecting that it would take a good year after the Games to get even’remotely settled. As it turned out, Harold helped me get this teaching job that I'm in now. I am teaching handicapped kids physical education. Although it's very high intensity type of work I get off work between 2 and 2.30 p.m. It gives me more time than I have had before to keep training.

Fr. Kelleher: What is your major target for the rest of the season and for the immediate future?

Declan: I am hoping to get to the Europa Cup in Iceland from L.A. If I can hold up my present form at that I will be happy. I don't expect much more. I peaked earlier on in the year. Long term, I am thinking of the Europeans next year, the World Championships the year after and then the Games in '88.


A lot of people have asked me: 'Were you not devastated when you bashed the cage to pieces?' The way I looked at it, it was only one more competition and I'm not really throwing just for that one competition. I'm throwing because I enjoy throwing. It's a challenge. I get to throw further every year. The whole think that I'm after is that I like throwing and I would like to keep throwing. A lot of people have said: 'I'm surprised you kept throwing'. No matter how bad you are going there is no sense in tying down on the ground and saying "I’m ruined now”.

Fr. Kelleher: From what you have been saying, Declan Hegarty is a happy man, happy doing his hammer, happy at work and hoping to do well in the future.
Declan: I am happy to throw further and keep it going.

Fr. Kelleher: Thank you, Declan.


Declan Hegarty


Declan Hegarty is an Irish Olympic Hammer Thrower. He represented Ireland at the 1984 Summer Olympics, in Los Angeles. His best throw in the 1984 Olympics was 70.56m, while his personal best, set in 1985, was a throw of 77.80m. Declan retired from throwing due to injury. After several years teaching in the US, he studied medicine.

 

Dr. Declan Hegarty, Inverness Surgical Associates, General Surgeon

 

CIT Track to Reopen on June 29th

CIT Track Re-Opening on Monday Week

cit track aerial view 1
Aerial view of CIT Track

 

In a welcome move, CIT Management have released a statement saying that they are to re-open the track facility from Monday June 29th, “to coincide with Phase 3 of the Guidelines as set down by Government”.

However there are several restrictions.


The track will initially be open only to CARDED and Elite International athletes only (Athletics Ireland High Performance Group), and MUST be booked in advance through a CIT booking system. The system is being formulated at present.

 

The track will then opened up, on a phased basis, to existing user clubs, after the intial opening has been reviewed. In the meantime, CIT Sports Dept will be in direct contact with existing user clubs, about matters relating to their club's usage of the track.

[While not decided yet, it is envisaged that all users will be required to show evidence of their Athletics Ireland membership at the gate (Probably in the form of a printout of their AAI Registration) ... But the precise details have yet to be decided)]


In addition there is a limit of 15 persons, in line with current HSE Guidelines, on the track at any time, including coaches and other personnel.

CIT will have a person on duty to manage access and monitor numbers.

CIT have also beefed up security at the track, in recent weeks, repairing damage in the perimeter fencing, and ensuring that the track is locked at all times.



Free Athletics Ireland OnLine Reservation System

The system is extremely user friendly, mobile phone compatible, and an individual registered Athletics Ireland Club member can book places for up to three other members at any time, without having to input the Athletics Ireland membership numbers for the other three members.

 

Athletics Ireland Online Reservation System

 

Reservation System Tutorial



UCC Mardyke Track

UCC continue to prepare the track facility, along with a new user management system, and hope to reopen their track over the summer months. (see Covid 19 - Return to Sport Expert Group Release - June 6th 2020)


Related Articles

 

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland FAQs re Phase 2 - June 12th 2020

 

Covid 19 - Return to Sport Expert Group Release - June 6th 2020

 

Athletics Ireland Run Jump Throw Workshop Webinar - June 2020

Run Jump Throw Workshop - June 2020

run jump throw

 

brand athleticsireland

 

Athletics Ireland are hosting a Run Jump Throw Workshop/Webinar, at 7:30pm, on Thursday June 11th 2020

Athletics Ireland RDO's Lilly-Ann O’Hora, Gerard O’Donnell and Grace Lynch will be covering Hurdles and Endurance, with approx. 45 mins spent on each event. Time will also be given for a Q&A session.

The Run Jump Throw is an introductory level workshop, and is suitable for novice/beginner coaches.

Coaches can register by emailing their own details to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., who will then send on the Zoom details prior to the workshop tomorrow.

 

 

 

Covid 19 - Return to Sport Expert Group Release - June 6th 2020

Expert Group Statement on Return to Sport Guidance for Outdoor Sports and Fitness - Saturday June 6th 2020


national sports institute paris june 2020 Photo: Getty Images - Post COVID-19 Lockdown scene Institute of Sport, Paris

 

Expert Group Statement on Return to Sport Guidance for Outdoor Sports and Fitness

Recognising that organised sports and fitness activities are permitted in outdoor settings for groups of up to 15 people from next Monday, the Expert Group on Return to Sport would advise organisers to consider the following guidance. This guidance should not be considered exhaustive, and organisers are advised to consult other official sources, in particular the advice published by the HSE.


• In advance of the activity, participants should be asked to travel to the activity venue alone or with members of the same household. Sharing transport is not advised in this Phase of the Roadmap.


• Encourage participants not to congregate at the beginning or end of the activity. Ask participants to arrive as close as possible to the activity start time, or to wait in their cars until the activity begins.


• Participants should be asked to bring their own water bottles, towels and where possible personal equipment, and instructed not to share these with others. Personal equipment should only be shared with people from the same household.


• Participants should be asked to wash hands on arrival, if possible, or to use hand sanitiser. If it is not possible to provide hand sanitiser at your location, participants should be asked to bring their own hand sanitiser with them.


Individual equipment provided to participants should be cleaned and sanitised before and after each activity session. It is recommended that time is scheduled between sessions to enable thorough cleaning and sanitisation to be conducted.


Sharing of equipment should be avoided wherever possible, as it is generally not permitted in this Phase of the Roadmap. If absolutely necessary, equipment should be cleaned and sanitised between use.


Participants should be spaced appropriately to maintain a minimum 2 metre physical distancing throughout the activity. Depending on the nature of the activity, it may be necessary to leave more space between participants.


• Participants should be encouraged to adopt good respiratory hygiene, covering their nose and mouth when they cough or sneeze, and using a tissue which is immediately disposed of. Further guidance on hygiene and social distancing is available from www.hse.ie/covid19


• All participants should be advised to stay home if they feel unwell, and to consult their GP. If a participant becomes unwell during the activity, they should be isolated from other participants and return home as soon as possible.


The Expert Group emphasises that indoor sporting facilities are not permitted to reopen during this Phase of the Roadmap. All activity should be in outdoor facilities; the use of showers and changing facilities should not be permitted.


The Expert Group also recommends that organisers maintain an electronic record of all participants for all sessions, with contact details. This will help to facilitate contact tracing in the event that a participant becomes ill with COVID-19.

 

 

Queries Concerning Aspects of Resumption - Who to Ask

Cork Athletics County Board has received a number of COVID-19 related queries, ranging from athletes asking what they must do to comply with the on-going updates to COVID-19 advisory notices from HSE & Athletics Ireland, to clubs concerned about Juvenile athletes, and group runs.

All such queries should be directed, in the first instance, to your own Club's COVID-19/Safety Officer, who will advise as to what protocols have been developed for YOUR Club.

If a club has not appointed a Club's COVID-19/Safety Officer and/or has not developed COVID-19 Protocols and Risk Assessments, then they may NOT resume club activities.  Athletics Ireland Insurance is NOT active in such circumstances.

All club activities must also be logged, with all participants's contact information up-to-date, so that effective and timely contact tracing can be carried out, should it be required.

Athletics Ireland has developed a FREE online booking system which can be used to facilitate clubs.
NOTE: The system is currently set up for a maximum of 4 people in each group. This will be changed to 15 max, from next week, when Phase 2 commences.  You will also need your AAI Life Registration Number, in order to make your booking. If you don't know this, you should contact your own Club Registrar.

 

Mardyke Track ReOpening

mardyke arena

 

In the summer months, UCC hopes to reopen the Mardyke track to Registered Clubs and Registered Users only, along with College students and staff. There will be an electronic portal trackside, where each authorised user will 'Tag In'/'Tag Out'.  The precise timeline for ReOpening has not been established yet, but UCC are actively working towards ReOpening.


Existing Race Permits
Athletics Ireland will be issuing a statement regarding permits shortly. Currently NO new permits are being considered, processed or issued.

A relatively large number of permits, issued before the COVID-19 crisis, are still in force. Many events have already cancelled, with some organisers, particularly those with events later in the year, are holding back on decisions, likely hoping that the situation changes.

However a small number of events appear to be going ahead, even though such gatherings would contravene HSE, Sport Ireland and AAI guidelines. All clubs and event organisers are reminded that AAI insurance, and, almost certainly, all insurance policies will NOT cover events that contravene guidelines in force at the time. The forthcoming Athletics Ireland statement on Permits should provide clarity on the situation.

Separately, Athletics Ireland has told Cork Athletics that it "does not see a return to competition before the autumn", and that "the first events are likely to be smaller ones, and 'down the country', in controlled situations" (e.g. on athletic tracks, or cross-country. In both situations, access and recording of details of those present can be recorded relatively easily, and numbers controlled also.

 

Please, please abide by the spirit of the HSE guidelines.

 

Related Articles

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland Statement re Phase 2 - June 5th 2020

 

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland Statement - June 2nd 2020

 

Covid 19 - Serious Training Issues

 

Re-Starting Clubs - Covid-19 Update May 9th 2020

 

Covid 19 and Long Runs or Long Periods in Public

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 24th

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 12th

 

Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 7th

 

Practical Guide for Clubs Returning to Athletics following the Covid-19 Restrictions during Phase 2 ofthe Roadmap for ReOpening Society

 

Always follow the Government Guidelines of


Good Hand Hygiene - Respiratory Etiquette - Social Distancing


Athletics Ireland Event Guidelines June 24th - Idiots Guide

How Can Some Organisers Think 500 Person Limit Equals 500 Participants.......?



tony holohan hseChief Medical Officer, Dr. Tony Holohan

"We know that numbers of 50 for the next phase, for indoor gatherings of all kinds - and that's 50, which includes all people present, whether they're staff or whether they're attendees - we know that that places a restriction on activities"

The Key Phrase here is "includes all people present, whether they're staff or whether they're attendees"  

I know some people are going to try to split hairs and point out "that's only for indoor events", but the same holds for the higher 200, and upcoming, from July 20th, 500 limits.

These are total people present, and this is stated in the AAI Guidelines: "Limits on capacity must take into account all staff, marshals, volunteers and Contractors at the event" and you can add Medical team(s) and Gardai to that, along with anyone else you have involved.

In addition, the guideline also require organisers to provide additional stewards and personnel in car parks, and other areas to guide people and oversee HSE COVID-19 guidelines.

Vocal Minority

We would like all of this to be over, so that we can resume 'normal life' ....whatever that was! Some people won't be happy until we have a vaccine/antidote...and then some more time 'to be sure'. The majority are taking tentative steps topwards re-emerging from their personal isolation, and a minority are seemingly just 'Gung-Ho'.

journal reopening poll statsA recent poll in The Journal.ie found that 28% of nearly 15,000 respondents felt that things are reopening Too Fast, while the majority, 52% believe that the pace is correct, while 13% feel it is too slow.

We ARE emerging, but things need to be taking steadily....Just steady on everyone, and release the handbrake slowly.  We need to protect each other. We are learning new ways of doing things, and, perhaps, not doing some things that we used to feel were essential, but now find that they really aren't.

We also need to try things on a small scale, before we can be confident that we can run the bigger and/or more complex events.  We also need to be aware that other Athletics Federations are organising smaller events initially, mostly behind closed doors, with road races coming at a later stage.

It's Only a Gimmick! 

homer simpson doh

That was a comment, reportedly said by one race organiser, about the AAI guidelines, and passed on to me earlier today.  The mind boggles!

This is pretty serious stuff. In the past few days, we have seen parts of the US go ballistic, with the virus spiking at higher levels than before their lockdown. Germany, seen as having virtually eliminated the virus, now has an entire town cordoned off, due to resurgence. Australia was also seen as another country to have controlled the virus, however 1,000 troops have been deployed there in recent days. It ain't gone away, it may be under some degree of control, but we have all put the effort into getting to this point - we don't want to become complacent and, like the 'Snakes & Ladders' boardgame, go sliding all the way back down....like California!

Sure...They're only Guidelines

Any organiser who feels that some, or all, the guidelines, are optional had better have a good and valid reason for not complying. In the not-so-unlikely event of something going 'pear shaped', they may well find themselves personally liable. In addition, bad publicity arising may drive sponsors away from future events.

The 3 C's

luke o neillProfessor Luke O'Neill

 

Virologist Professor Luke O'Neill constantly stresses the need to avoid the 3 C's: Closed Spaces, Crowded locations and Close-Contacts, with the danger worsened when there is an overlap of any two, or, worse still, when all three C's overlap. 

the 3 cs

Race organisers can all but eliminate the Closed Spaces issue, by following the guidelines along with good planning.

The other two are more difficult, but should also be minimised to the greatest possible extent.  Clearly the time of greatest overlap of Crowded locations and Close-Contacts is at race start, and the period before that. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, at and after the finish, and around parking locations.



So What Do You need to Do?


Firstly, Read the Fecking Manuals!! ....Everyone!!

 

Road Race Event Organiser Guidelines

 

Road Race Volunteer, Staff and Marshalls Guidelines

 

Road Race Participant Guidelines

NB This is only an extract of Key Points!!

 

Every Event should appoint a COVID-19 Officer, who should have NO Other Responsibility
This person should ensure that all COVID plans are in place, that all race personnel are familiar with and compliant with HSE & AAI guidelines, and that all necessary contact details and waivers have been received from all participants, race personnel, support entities and, literally, everyone present.

 

On the day
You will need additional signage and operate routes to and from key locations, in such a way as to minimise crowding and contact.


You need efficient and effective communications, via radio or mobile phone


Plenty of hand sanitiser


Ideally no baggage drop.....people should leave all personal belongings in their cars.


All race personnel should be wearing appropriate PPE


Any desks. e.g. Help desk, should have Plexi-Glass screens and NO sharing of pens/biros, or other material.

Toilets
Try to go before you leave home....both race personnel and participants
Minimise contact with surfaces and wash your hands/use sanitiser

Start Area
Only essential race personnel should be in the start area, along with participants.
Where possible, use waves and time zones.

NO PACERS!

Participants ...NO Spitting!! If you need to clear your throat, swallow it!  If you need to snort/blow your nose, use a tissue and put it in YOUR pocket, or bin it!

No chopping in and out around other runners, and no shoving, pushing etc


Water stations.....Do you really need to take on water? If you're properly hydrated, you probably don't.

Finish Line
Once you've finished, go home, or wait for your colleagues at your car. Do NOT hang around the finish area.

 

Timing
Hand timing should only be done for very small, and widely spaced finishers. There should be absolutely NO queueing at the finish. Chip timing is recommended, both for timing and also for contact tracing.

Sterile Area
The finish line and immediate surrounds should be a sterile area....in other words, there shouldn't be anyone in the zone who is not essential.  In addition, a separate area will be required for anyone in distress, where medical personnel can tend to them.

Spectators
NO spectators should be Present

Marshalls/Stewards
You will need an awful lot more marshalls/stewards/helpers under Covid-19, and these will eat into your overall total numbers. All officials should be readily identifiable

 

 

Sod Turned on CIT Sports Arena and High-Performance Centre

Tánaiste Simon Coveney Turns Sod on CIT Sports Arena and High-Performance Centre

Monday June 22nd 2020



cit hp centre sod turning aTánaiste Simon Coveney, with Griffin Construction personnel at today's Sod Turning

This morning, the sod was turned on CIT's new €22m Sports Arena.
 artists impression cit high performance sports arena

Artist's impression of the new facility


This is the first stage in a two-phase programme to develop state-of-the-art sports facilities on the Cork campus.

 

artists impression cit high performance sports arena approach

Artist's impression of the approach to the facility

 

Phase 1 is the construction of the Sports Arena, while phase two will see the construction of the Indoor Community and High-Performance sports facility.



Tánaiste Simon Coveney speaking after the sod Turning Ceremony



 

The 3,600 sq. metre building will contain a large multi-function hall, including incorporating two basketball courts, with seating for 400 spectotors, gym, public foyer including café pod, changing facilities areas, along with several and a series studios/rooms.

The 800 sq. metre gym will include 100 fitness machines, along with a strength and conditioning area.


The building is also intended as a venue for examination sittings, student concerts, higher education conferences, and teh like.

Phase 2 will see the development of the 3,500 sq. metre High-Performance Indoor Athletics Centre, featuring a large multi-event zone, with a 60m - 80 Sprint Track, and elite training laboratories, along with facilities for Field Events such as High Jump, Pole Vault, Long Jump and Triple Jump.

Speaking at the event, Hamish Adams, CEO of Athletics Ireland, said: “This investment by Government will deliver huge benefits for the sporting community in the southern region.”

Dr Barry O’Connor, CIT President, said: “This development will be a massive boost not only for athletics, but for all sport in Cork, the surrounding community and across Munster generally.”

 

cit hp centre sod turning b cit hp centre sod turning c cit hp centre sod turning d
     

ReStarting Athletics - June 19th 2020

Now the Fun Begins - Managing the ReStart of Athletics

Editorial

The contents of this editorial do not necessarily reflect the views of Cork Athletics County Board

 

back to business restarting athletics

This evening, the Govenment announced the consolidation of Phases 3, 4 and 5 of the Road to Recovery plan. Included in the revised schedule is the resumption of all sports, although with limited spectator numbers.


From 29 June, groups of 50 will be allowed indoors, with groups of 200 permitted outdoors. This will increase from 20 July, with the outdoor numbers increasing to 500. No indication was given as to when the 500 limit might be increased, however An Taoiseach said that no event of 5,000 or more would be permitted before the end of September.

A caveat is that each individual sport's National Governing Body must decide when that sport will reopen, and at what pace. So, we will have to wait and see Athletics Ireland's plans are. We can probably expect to hear those over the weekend, or early next week.


What does this mean for Clubs?

On the face of it, it looks like all clubs will be able to reopen fully from June 29th, subject to the 200 limit. It should be noted that ALL CLUBS must have a contact system in place, and also ensuring that all members contacts are up to date. As per earlier AAI statements, each club MUST have appointed a COVID-19 Safety Officer...So, if you haven't already done so, please do it NOW!


Races and Events

Athletics Ireland Insurance for events has been suspended since March. It remains suspended until AAI says otherwise, so it is advisable not to jump the gun. We have been awaiting, for several weeks now, a response to a request for a statement, with periodic updates, on the status of Event Permits that had been granted quite some time ago - in some cases as much as 12 months ago.

It is likely thatevents will be required to update their event Medical Plans, to cover aspects of COVID-19. They will also be responsible for ensuring contact details for all participants, event personnel, and spectators.  It should be noted that the 200 limit includes all of these additional people, so the 200 limit may mean that participant numbers are limited to 150 to 170, depending on the complexity of the event

The 500 limit, effective from July 20th, will have the same constraints arising from race support, so participant numbers are likely to be limited to 450 to 470.

Overview

All in All, these are positive developments, but we need to walk before we sprint. As in any 'normal' event (pre-COVID), mistakes will be made, but we must learn from them...and pass the word to other clubs and organisers. Some clubs are already partially back, while others are still waiting - perhaps due to lack of access to a premises. Whether you're back or not, you MUST appoint a COVID-19 Safety Officer. If you resume without doing so, there is a strong possibility that some aspects of liability may fall on the club officers, particularly club chairperson. 

Tracks and other facilities in Cork have been closed during the Lockdown. These are opening up gradually, as control masures are put in place to cater for changes arising from COVID-19.  It is unfortunate that, in Cork, we do not have a track that is under the control of Cork Athletics, or any of its member clubs.  This is a disappointing position to be in, and perhaps something we all should examine critically and constructively.  It should be noted however that the Mallow track development should go some way towards easing this problem....but that's a little bit down the road yet.

 

 

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland FAQs re Phase 2 - June 12th 2020

Athletics Ireland COVID-19 FAQ re ReOpening - Phase 2 - Friday June 12th 2020

aai covid 19 advice phase 2 faqs

Athletics Ireland's FAQ’s for Phase 2 of Lockdown Exit


Key Developments in Phase 2 include:

    Groups of up to 15, including trainers and coaches, may return to non-contact outdoor training activity (but not matches) while maintaining social distancing at all times.


    You may travel within your own county, or up to 20 kilometres from your home if crossing county boundaries.

 

Can 12-year olds turning 13 years in 2020 train with their age group?

Yes, all those born in 2007 and before can train in their club and are insured.

 

Will there be any Track and Field Competition this year?

The Juvenile and Competition Committees are meeting regularly to plan a return to competition within government guidelines. Provisional dates in August and September are planned for Under 14 groups and above and these will be published in the coming days. Note – all dates will be contingent on meeting government guidelines.


Can Over 70’s attend the Club?

In relation to the vulnerable Over 70 years population, the advice currently is that they may leave their houses for exercise, but they should limit contact with other people, even on a socially distanced basis. This advice does not recommend over 70s attending sports clubs however, it is not mandatory, it is advisory, so individuals can make their own decisions.

 

Will Summer Camps Proceed?

Government guidelines allow summer camps to proceed in line with strict procedures around outdoor activity only, social distancing, contact tracing and excellent hygiene. A final decision on Athletics Ireland Summer Camps proceeding will be made in the coming days.

 

Logistics of attending a club session - example

  •     Maintain social distancing during training at all times
  •     Carry a bottle of hand sanitiser and use regularly
  •     If using equipment wipe clean before and after use

 

Can more than one group of 15 operate in my club at once?

Yes, your club is responsible for developing its own risk assessment document. If the club believes it can safely operate with more than one group on site then it can. The risk assessment is subject to meeting all social distancing, contact tracing and hygiene requirements.


Do all attending need to complete the health screening questionnaire?

Yes, all attending the club must complete the health screening questionnaire. At the very least the coach should read the questionnaire aloud to all groups and any participant answering yes to the session should be excluded and contact their GP.

 

We meet as a training group in a local park, does the AAI insurance cover us there?

Yes, once you are a club committee approved group the insurance policy is in place for you.

 

Does the Club Covid Compliance Officer need to have medical qualifications or expertise?

No, the role of the Club Covid Officer is detailed in the Club Covid Guidelines on page 2 and they do not need to have medical experience


Will Athletics Ireland provide training on Club Covid Compliance Officer?

There is a webinar on the Athletics Ireland website  This page has related information and guidance on the role. Sport Ireland will be providing additional training supports in time and these will be released to the clubs in due course.


Is the club required to put up Covid-19 posters?

Yes, if possible, it is important to advise visitors of their responsibility to maintain social distance, hygiene and sneezing/cough etiquette.


Is the Covid Compliance Officer solely responsible for ensuring good practices on our return to activity in our club?

No, everyone is equally responsible for ensuring best practices are implemented, the Covid-19 officer merely coordinates that plan.


Is the coach one of the fifteen or is it fifteen athletes and a coach?

The coach is counted as one of the fifteen.



Cork Athletics Note Re Races & Permits

Cork Athletics County Board is still awaiting information from Athletics Ireland regarding the status of existing Race Permits. Many events have permits which were granted before the COVID-19 crisis. These permits are still valid, however McMahon Galvin, Athletics Ireland's Insurance Brokers, confirmed to Cork Athletics, yesterday, that insurance cover for all events remains suspended until further notice. In effect, this means that events may not proceed at present. In addition, race organisers will probably find that there are issues with other critical race matters, for example Medical Cover (e.g. Red Cross, etc) 

 

Editorial Comment - Races

While things are opening up slowly, and we may see T&F and/or Cross-Country from late August, it appears unlikely that road racing will resume for the foreseeable future.  Several races are holding out, watching each other, waiting to see who blinks first, but bottom line is, without HSE Guideline compliance, it is hard to see any event getting insurance or medical cover, so we will probably have to hold tough for a while longer

Please, please abide by the spirit of the HSE guidelines.

 

Related Articles

Covid 19 - Return to Sport Expert Group Release - June 6th 2020

 

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland Statement - June 2nd 2020

 

Covid 19 - Serious Training Issues

 

Re-Starting Clubs - Covid-19 Update May 9th 2020

 

Covid 19 and Long Runs or Long Periods in Public

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 24th

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 12th

 

Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 7th

 

Practical Guide for Clubs Returning to Athletics following the Covid-19 Restrictions during Phase 2 ofthe Roadmap for ReOpening Society

 

Echo Mini-Marathon News - June 10th 2020

News - Echo Mini-Marathon 2020

Sunday September 20th 2020

IMG 7354 minStart of Cork Women's Min-Marathon 2015


This year's Mini-Marathon is changing!  We're not saying, just yet,what the format will be, but the organisers, Cork Athletics County Board, are committed to ensuring that Cork's women, who walk and and run the event every year, and, in doing so, raise approx. €1M for their chosen charities, will not miss out due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year, in particular, the focus will be on facilitating participants fund raise for charity, at a time when charities have been badly hit by cancelled collections and flag days, along with closure of their charity shops, and many other fundraising activities.




The Echo Cork Womens Mini-Marathon Launch

Echo live logo

Today, Wednesday June 10th, The Echo has featured the Mini-Marathon, on both the front page and also inside the paper.  This year's 'special format' event will be launched later this month, giving all the details of the options available. The Registration page will be going live at the same time.

 

Sponsors:


The Flagship Sponsor for the past 39 years has been The Echo

 

Echo live logo


echo mini marathon medal 2019 c
2019 Finishers Medal

 

Echo Mini-Marathon Page

 

 

 

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland Statement re Phase 2 - June 5th 2020

Athletics Ireland COVID-19 Statement re ReOpening - Phase 2 - Friday June 5th 2020

aai covid 19 advice phase 2

To All Athletics Ireland Stakeholders

Athletics Ireland is delighted to share the Phase 2 guidance protocols with you as we exit lockdown. The good news announced by our Taoiseach this afternoon includes an increase in the size of outdoor training groups to fifteen (15) and an extension to the distance we can travel to train. People can travel within their own County, or up to 20km from their home, whichever is further.

 

Guidance for Clubs  (PDF File)   -  Content

 

Guidance for Athletes (PDF File)  -   Content

 

Guidance for Coaches (PDF File)  - Content

 

Note these protocols do not commence until this Monday the 8th June 2020.

 

 

Sport Ireland Statement re Return to Training for High Performance Athletes

 

Please, please abide by the spirit of the HSE guidelines.

 

Related Articles

Covid 19 - Athletics Ireland Statement - June 2nd 2020

 

Covid 19 - Serious Training Issues

 

Re-Starting Clubs - Covid-19 Update May 9th 2020

 

Covid 19 and Long Runs or Long Periods in Public

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 24th

 

Update - Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 12th

 

Athletics Ireland Events and Covid 19 Coronavirus - March 7th

 

Practical Guide for Clubs Returning to Athletics following the Covid-19 Restrictions during Phase 2 ofthe Roadmap for ReOpening Society

 

Always follow the Government Guidelines of


Good Hand Hygiene - Respiratory Etiquette - Social Distancing


The guidelines in this document relate to Phase 2 of the Irish Government's Roadmap for Reopening Society and Business.
Key Notes for this phase:


1.    Permits sporting activity in open outdoor public sports amenities where social distancing can be maintained.
2.    Permits people to engage in outdoor sporting and fitness activities, either individually or in a group (maximum 15 people), where social distancing can be maintained and where there is no contact.
3.    Permits those individuals travel within their own county, or up to 20 km from their home, whichever is greater.
4.    If you feel unwell do not present to the club.
5.    If you are recovering from Covidl9 seek medical advice prior to returning to train.
6.    If running in single file increase the distance between athletes to more than 2m.

1.    Safety Officer


Clubs MUST appoint an assigned Safety Officer responsible for managing issues and queries relating to the Covid-19 pandemic.

This Officer should:

  • Ensure indoor facilities are not utilized during this phase of reopening.
  • Plan the club return to operation with the club committee.
  • Should check with their insurers if any amendments to their policies are required to cover Covid-19 issues.
  • Ensure they review these protocols and that the club can comply before reopening their club.
  • Ensure that the club and its members adhere to HSE / Public Health advice in all cases.
  • Ensure that sufficient HSE Covid-19 information Posters are in place.
  • Operate a booking system for all training. This will help with contact tracing if necessary. Ensure athletes understand the need for social distancing while entering and exiting the club.
  • Ensure that the club maintains accurate records of who is training and when. This should include all persons and not just the one making the booking. This must be carried out for all sessions, and in the case that a parent/guardian is present in the club that must also be recorded. This will help with contact tracing if necessary.
  • Be responsible for informing all members of the Covid-19 guidelines and insist on full cooperation.
  • Ensure that the contact details for all members are up to date as this will assist with contact tracing should it be necessary.
  • Listen to feedback and contact Athletics Ireland if there are issues not covered under these protocols.
  • Ensure all athletes and coaches carry hand sanitizer and antiseptic wipes at all times.

 

2.    Club Access

In the initial period following a club's reopening, access to the clubhouse should be limited to committee members only and only for emergency access by athletes.

  •  Club facilities should only be accessed by members.
  • Children under 13 years should not attend the club during phase 2.
  • To access the club property in this phase of the reopening, an athlete should:
  • Be a current member & a minimum of 13 years of age.
  • A parent/guardian should accompany any athlete under 18 years.
  • Not have been out of the country in the last 14 days.
  • Not have been around someone with symptoms of Covid-19 in the last 14 days
  • Not be in a period of self-isolation and/or cocooning under the current Health Policy Rules.
  • Not be displaying COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Live within a 20k radius of the club or live in the same County.
  • Have a pre-reserved training time.
  • Be under 70 years of Age.

 

3.    Booking and Arrival

  • Booking a time in advance is required, preferably via the FREE AAI Club booking system, website, app, or phone. This will assist should contact tracing be required subsequently.
  • All athletes should ensure their club has their up-to-date contact details (phone and email).
  • All athletes, and not just the athlete making the booking, should be included in the booking notes. If there is a change to who is training, it is advisable to make sure the booking is updated.
  • Athletes should travel to the club alone, or only with a member of the same household.
  • Ample car parking spaces should be available to ensure social distancing. If athletes must park next to another car, they should wait for the other person to exit or enter before doing so themselves.
  • Athletes should arrive at the club entrance no more than 10 minutes prior to training time. It is important that athletes maintain social distancing and wait in a pre-designated waiting area that allows for social distancing.
  • Athletes should observe social distancing at all times and resist the temptation to mingle.
  • Athletes should arrive in training kit and change footwear at the car or at home.
  • Athletes should sanitize their hands prior to attending the club.
  • Athletes should ensure that they utilize toilet facilities in their own home prior to arriving at the club as club toilets will not be accessible.

 

4.    Check-in Protocol

Two-metre queue markers should be in place at any single-entry point.

 

5.    Clubhouse Facilities

  • Clubhouse access for members should only be in emergencies.
  • Toilets should not be opened in this phase.
  • Changing rooms, function rooms and where relevant, the club bar will remain closed during this Phase of reopening.
  • Athletes must provide their own equipment where possible.

 

6.    Track/Field

  • Training groups should be controlled and managed to ensure social distancing is maintained at all times. More than one group can train onsite with appropriate social distancing e.g. long jump group and track group.
  • Athletes should enter the area one at a time as and when directed.
  • Entrances / Gates to clubs should remain open, if safe to do so, perhaps tied back to prevent use of handles.
  • Rubbish bins should be removed, and all items should be taken home afterwards.
  • Any athletes(s) repeatedly not following the club directives should be asked to leave the club.
  • There should be no spectators present during this phase of reopening.
  • Parents supervising children should be limited to one and maintain ample distance from the training activity if staying on site.

 

7.    Running/Jumping/Throwing

  • Physical distancing should be observed throughout the period of training.
  • Athletes must refrain from handshakes and high fives.
  • Equipment such as towels, food, and drink must not be exchanged between athletes.
  • Athletes should avoid touching their face after handling equipment.
  • Athletes should bring a small bottle of hand sanitizer and antiseptic wipes to keep with them at all times. This is to prevent the virus spreading if present.
  • Athletes must remain apart from other athletes when taking a break.

 


8.    On the Track/Field - Coaching

  • Coaches should prepare and present a Risk Assessment document and get approval to coach from the Club Safety Officer.
  • Only coaching in a group of up to 15 people should take place during this phase of the reopening.
  • Coaching sessions should be booked and recorded.
  • Coaches must brief their athletes and/or their parents of the protocols that should be followed in advance of the session.
  • Coaching must only be provided to club members or approved users.
  • Coaches must ensure an athlete has registered their contact details with the club.
  • Coaches should limit the use of equipment such as cones, hurdles etc.
  • Do not let athletes manipulate the practice equipment. Coaches should take charge of picking up the equipment.
  • Coaches to wear latex gloves if handling any equipment is required.
  • Users of athletics tracks and similar facilities adhering to the basics of track etiquette and groups cooperating to avoid situations where social distancing could be compromised. This might include limiting the total number of people on the track at any one time and working together to organise how the space is used. For example, an endurance group using lanes 1-3 while a sprints group used 5-8.


For endurance sessions:

o Athletes running single file unless there is an empty space where they can leave greater than 2m between them.
o Athletes running with greater than 2m between themselves and the next runner. This might, for example, mean overtaking in lane 3 to pass an athlete running in lane one on a track.
o Athletes starting intervals in approximate order of ability with the fastest athlete starting first to minimize overtaking.


Getting Home Safely

  • Once training has finished athletes must leave the premises promptly, sanitizing their hands on the way out.
  • Clubs must make provision for thorough cleaning of all accessible areas and ensuring that all "touch areas" are cleaned thoroughly daily.
  • If an athlete becomes unwell after training, they should first contact their GP and read the HSE guidelines and then inform their club. The club should contact the HSE and follow the advice provided to them on the next steps.

 

Advice for Athletes

Return to Restricted Training


Always follow the Government Guidelines of


Good Hand Hygiene - Respiratory Etiquette - Social Distancing


The guidelines in this document relate to Phase 2 of the Irish Government's Roadmap for Reopening Society and Business.
Key Notes for this Phase:


1.    Permits sporting activity in open outdoor publicsportsamenitieswhere social distancing can be maintained


2.    Permits people to engage in outdoor sporting and fitness activities, either individually or in a group (maximum 15 people), where social distancing can be maintained and where there is no contact


3.    Permits those individuals travel within their own county, or up to 20 km from their home, whichever is greater


4.    If you feel unwell do not present to the club


5.    If you are recovering from Covidl9 seek medical advice prior to returning to train


6.    If running in single file increase the distance between athletes to more than 2m


This practical guide, prepared by our team in consultation with international norms and medical experts, outlines the robust measures Athletics Ireland would like clubs to implement with coaches and athletes to maintain to help safe-guard members during the COVID-19 pandemic.


The measures, which relate to Phase 2 of the Roadmap for ReOpening Irish Society and Business, cover each step of the journey from home to the club gate and back home again.


These measures should be in place seven days a week and until further notice.


Our measures and proceduresare underconstant review and updated as advice from government, health authorities and governing bodies evolves in line with the gradual lifting of social restrictions.

 

Before You Train

You must stay at home if you:
Have been in contact with someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days
Have been overseas or exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days
Have flu-like symptoms or are feeling unwell

You must:
Check with your GP prior to playing if you are in a high-risk health category
Find out what protocols are in place at the club
Ensure your club has up-to-date contact details for you
Pre-book your training session on the AAI booking system, or via phone Arrive and leave as close as possible to when you are due at the club.

Only one parent/guardian should accompany younger athletes where possible.
Athletes should arrive ready to train as there will be no access to dressing rooms duringthis phase.
Athletes should ensure that they utilize toilet facilities in their own home prior to arriving at the club, as toilet facilities will not be available during thisphase.
Athletes should, ideally, bring a small bottle of hand sanitizer, and antiseptic wipes with them to train.

 

Attending Training

Pre-book your training session on the AAI booking system, or via phone

Arrive and leave as close as possible to when you are due at the club.

Only one parent/guardian should accompany younger athletes where possible.
Athletes should arrive ready to train as there will be no access to dressing rooms duringthis phase.
Athletes should ensure that they utilize toilet facilities in their own home prior to arriving at the club as toilet facilities will not be available during thisphase.
Athletes should, ideally, bring a small bottle of hand sanitizer and antiseptic wipes with them to train.

 

Social Distancing Behaviours

To protect against infection:
Athletes must refrain from handshakes and high fives
Keep 2 metres away from other people at all times
Do not share food, towels and drinks

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or hand-sanitizer, before and after eating, after going to the toilet, sneezing and coughing
Cover your coughs and sneezes and dispose of any used tissue in your own bag and bring it home with you
Avoid touching your face
Keep your distance from people who are obviously sick
Try not to touch any surfaces, but if you do sanitize your hands as soon as possible

 

• For endurance sessions:
Athletes running single file unless there is an empty space where they can leave greater than 2m between themselves.
Athletes running with greater than 2m between themselves and the next runner, including when overtaking. This might, for example, mean overtaking in lane 3 to pass an athlete running in lane one on a track, o Athletes starting intervals in approximate order of ability with the fastest athlete starting first to minimise overtaking.

Remain apart from other athletes when taking a break.

 

When Training Finishes

Once training has finished athletes should leave the club promptly

Hands should be washed and sanitized as soon as possible
Ensure equipment is cleaned thoroughly after use.
If an athlete becomes unwell after training, they should first contact their GP and read the HSE guidelines, and then inform their club. The club will then follow advice provided to them by the HSE on the next steps
Members should be encouraged to remind other members of the guidelines, in a gentle way, wh en th ey witn ess poor p racti ces. Repeated poor practice should be reported to the club as soon as possible

 

Equipment

Practice caution with the equipment. Sanitize all handheld implements prior to and after use e.g. shots, javelins, discus etc.
Although there is no specific evidence that equipment can spread COVID-19, we know that contamination from respiratory droplets froman infected person can potentially survive on hard surfaces for up to three days.
Clean equipment with a disinfectant spray at the conclusion of training.


Advice for Coaches


Return to Restricted Training


Always follow the Government Guidelines of


Good Hand Hygiene - Respiratory Etiquette - Social Distancing


The guidelines in this document relate to Phase 2 of the Irish Government's Roadmap for Reopening Society and Business.
Key Noes for this Phase:
1.    Permits sporting activity in open outdoor public sports amenities where social distancing can be maintained
2.    Permits people to engage in outdoor sporting and fitness activities, either individually or in a group (maximum 15 people), where social distancing can be maintained and where there is no contact
3.    Permits those individuals travel within their own county, or up to 20 km from their home, whichever is greater
4.    If you feel unwell do not present to the club
5.    If you are recovering from Covid19 seek medical advice prior to returning to train
6.    If running in single file increase the distance between athletes to more than 2m

This practical guide, prepared by our team in consultation with international norms and medical experts, outlines the robust measures Athletics Ireland would like clubs to implement with coaches and athletes tomaintain to help safeguard club members during the COVID-19 pandemic.


The measures, which relate to Phase 2 of the Roadmap for Reopening Irish Society and Business, cover each step of the journey from home to the club gate and back home again.


These measures should be in place seven days a week and until further notice.


Our measures and procedures are under constant review and updated as advice from government, health authorities and governing bodies evolves in line with the gradual lifting of social restrictions.


Before you Coach

Develop and prepare a risk assessment and consult with your club how lessons can be delivered safely
Ensure that you get permission from the club to carry out your session
You or your athlete(s) should stay at home if you or they:
Have been in contact with someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days
Have been overseas or exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days O Have flu-like symptoms
Are in a high-risk health category. Such athletes should consult with their GP prior to training Are over 70 years of age

 

Preparing for a Coaching Session

Sessions should only take place outdoors during this phase of the reopening.

Coaching should take place only where full physical distancing is possible.

Pre book your session at the club online via the AAI booking system or via phone and advise who will be in attendance.
Let your athlete know, preferably in writing, before the session how you expect them to act to help ensure a safe environment for themselves and others, and what precautions you have put in place. Advise parents in the case of younger athletes. Parents should be asked to reiterate the advice to their children pre-training.

 

Prior to the session inform your athlete that:

Only people core to you r session can be in attendance.
Athletes should arrive and leave as close as possible to when you need to be there.
Onlyoneparent/guardianshouldaccompany younger athletes where possible.
Athletes should arrive ready to train as changing room access will not be possible.
Athletes and coaches should wash their hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer when available, before and assoon as possibleafter the training session.
Athletes should carry a bottle of hand sanitizer and antiseptic wipes at all times.


During the Training Session

Limit the use of coaching equipment such as cones.
Don't let the athletes handle any coaching equipment if possible. The coach should pick up any equipment used eg cones.
Be aware of what surfaces you or your athlete(s) touch and if you touch the equipmentsuch as hurdles, cones, rakes etc. you must clean these before you leave. Coaches should haveaccesstodisposable disinfectant wipes at all times.
Maintain physical distancing at all times including when giving feed back and while athletes are resting.
When training finishes athletes must leave the club promptly.
If coaches witness poor practice it should be addressed immediately in a polite fashion and ongoing disregard for protocols should be reported to the club as soon as possible.

• For endurance sessions:
Athletes running single file unless there is an empty space where they can leave a distance of more than 2m between themselves. Athletes running with greater than 2m between them and themselves and the next runner, including when overtaking. This might, for example, mean overtaking in lane 3 to pass an athlete running in lane one on a track.
Athletes starting intervals in approximate order of ability with the fastest athlete starting first to minimise overtaking.


Equipment


Practice caution with all equipment and avoid letting the athletes touch unnecessarily.
Clean all equipment with a disinfectant spray prior to and after use.
Although there is no specific evidence that equipment can spread COVID-19, we know that contamination by respiratory droplets from an infected person can potentially survive on hard surfaces for up to three days.
Try to restrict equipment to a particular group.
Clean all equipment with a disinfectant spray at the conclusion of your session.

About Us

Cork Athletics County Board is a constituent member of Athletics Ireland. Cork Athletics is the governing body, administering athletics, track and field (T&F), cross-country (XC) and running in county Cork. The Board comprises elected representatives of constituent athletic clubs and running clubs. Cork County Board AAI organises Championship races and competition, including road, track & field (T&F) and Cross-country (XC), at junior, juvenile, senior and masters levels, and selects representation for the county. In addition, training and education is provided for coaches and officials. The Board also regulates the Athletics Ireland race/event permit (licence) process for county Cork.
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